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In Sweden will award ceremony Stockholm "Premium Water

August 21 2008
06:37

Today in the City Hall capital of Sweden, will hold a ceremony awarding the Stockholm International Prize of water in 2008. Winner of the award this year was a Briton, John Anthony Allan, a professor of the London King's College and Graduate School of Oriental and African Studies, suggested and developed the concept of "virtual water".

This term explains how water issues are linked with agriculture, economics, politics and climate change, the press service of the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), which annually calls the name of the winner. In awarding the prize, the international jury draws the big winner of the educational work, the report said. "The use of water by people not just about what we drink it or bathe in it," says the press service of the Swedish Institute.

Professor Allan in 1993 attracted the attention of the fact that the scientific debate, he introduced the concept of "virtual water". The notion has become a kind of tool to measure the entire process of using water from the production of food or manufactured goods prior to their acquisition by consumers. For example, a cup of coffee we drink in the morning, actually takes 140 liters of 'virtual water'. This figure includes the entire process of growing and transporting coffee. Approximately the same amount of water - 140 liters - every day for drinking and household needs using an average of one person in the UK. To cook a hamburger, continues to press-service of SIWI, leaving approximately 2.4 thousand liters of water.

The ceremony of awarding the Stockholm International Water Prize in 2008 will begin at the Town Hall, the capital of Sweden, at 18.30 Moscow, writes, "Pravda.ru.

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